Six reasons to build a superyacht in New Zealand

World-beating reputation for deep lasting quality

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“A small, family-owned business, building just a handful of finely crafted yachts, yet very much at home amongst the world’s most awarded yacht builders.”

New Zealand’s yacht builders have never been amongst the largest in the world, yet all have been amongst the most respected.

McMullen & Wing’s yachts are respected the world over for that rare combination of fine finish, exceptional innovation and a strong sense of purpose. Regarded as a member of the highest echelons of world yacht building, McMullen & Wing combines the personal engagement of a boutique business with the reputation to assure absolute trust to deliver at the highest level.

The mark of a truly great yacht however lies not simply in how she looks and operates when first completed, but in how she carries her years and miles. McMullen & Wing is famous around the yacht industry for choosing to show off our older yachts as much as our new ones. A yacht which looks and performs as well as new with 100,000 miles under her keel, despite never having had more than basic maintenance, is a truly great yacht indeed. Quality beyond craftsmanship: a deep, lasting integrity.

 

The World’s Most Trusted Nation

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Frequently rated “The World’s Most Trusted Nation” (Transparency International) and “The Best Country in the World for Business” (Forbes), New Zealand is truly the best place in the world to build a superyacht: honest and ethical, friendly and safe, open and accommodating.

There is an ancient Maori proverb, “He aha te mea nui o te Ao? Maku e ki atu. He tangata, he tangata, he tangata! Translated: What is the greatest thing in the world? I will tell you: it is people, it is people, it is people!

Indeed it is impossible to visit New Zealand without being touched by the people: our friendly welcome, our trustworthy, helpful manner and our relaxed, “can-do” attitude.

New Zealand is a young but richly multicultural nation, far from the troubles of the world and firmly rooted in our place in the South Pacific yet connected to the world through heritage, culture and business.

Enjoy the Journey

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New Zealand’s North Island is not only the birthplace of some of the world’s finest superyacht builders, it is also one of the world’s hottest tourist destinations. The people at McMullen & Wing can help you build a lifetime of memories around the process of building your new yacht, both inside the shipyard and beyond.

 

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How better to enjoy the process of building your dream yacht than to take the time for some R&R? Perhaps a round of golf at one of New Zealand’s spectacular coastal courses. Enjoy fine food, wine and relaxation at one of New Zealand’s world-renowned luxury lodges. Help your children re-create their own Middle Earth movie experience at Hobbiton or other locations made famous by the Lord of the Rings movies.
38773AM00: Aoraki / Mount Cook (3754m) and Lake Pukaki in winter. Mt La Perouse (3078m) left, Tasman Valley and Burnett Mountains Range right. Panorama with late autumn colours, Aoraki / Mount Cook National Park, MacKenzie District, New Zealand. Photocredit to be given as Rob Suisted / www.naturespic.co.nz.

New Zealand’s South Island is another world again. A land of spectacular contrasts: warm, sun-soaked vineyards and beaches in the north and muscular alpine ranges in the south. Try heli-skiing on an untracked slope of powder snow, visit an icy glacier slowly inching its way to the sea, challenge your nerves jet boating or white water rafting on the Shotover River, or float in the quiet eeriness over the top of the majestic Southern Alps in a hot air balloon.

 

Most Memorable Maiden Cruise

There’s no coastline in the world like New Zealand’s and ours has become the favourite of many a seasoned world sailor. So before you leave our shores, why not cruise our beautiful waters: this is a country for yachtsmen. Our coastlines offer incredible diversity within short cruising times; there’s a new landscape, adventure or experience to discover around every headland. From top to bottom, night and day, a wide variety of sights and activities on offer mean you’ll never be bored. Our diving and fishing are worldclass. The father of modern diving, Jacques Yves Cousteau, rated the Poor Knights Islands, some 12 nautical miles off the Northland coast, as one of the top ten dives sites in the world. Others describe this pristine marine reserve as offering the best subtropical diving in the world. For those who live for the thrill of game fishing, or others looking for the ultimate location to tick this majestic sport off their bucket list, New Zealand’s summer is the perfect season for prize billfish. At night and away from the city lights, our clear, dark skies will reveal starscapes beyond your wildest dreams. In late summer you may see the aurora australis – the southern lights – a glowing curtain of green and red light beamed all the way from Antarctica. And while much of New Zealand is quite sparsely inhabited, everywhere you go you will find a friendly smile: local people keen to share their homeland with visitors and always looking for opportunities to help ensure your stay is happy and memorable. When you eventually say goodbye to New Zealand you will find yourself leaving a little piece of yourself behind – just to make sure that you will take the time to return.

 

Gateway to the South Pacific

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One adventure comes to an end; another is waiting. As you leave New Zealand, make time to explore paradise in the South Seas on your way. Your spirits will begin to rise as you take your first glimpse of Oceania’s sun-kissed island paradises. Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia: the names evoke images of remote coral atolls and ancient cultures preserved. Together the islands and nations of the Pacific are a destination in themselves, but they also make the perfect stepping stones for a delivery passage wherever you are headed: America, Asia, or via the Panama Canal to the East Coast of America and Europe.

Stunning picture-postcard locations make up the tropical islands of French Polynesia, New Guinea, the Cook Islands, Tonga, Samoa, Fiji, the Solomon Islands, and remote Easter Island. Coming ashore you’ll take several steps back in time: the islands remain refreshingly unhurried, undeveloped, untouched and unspoiled. Discover diverse cultures steeped in a tradition and history that spans two waves of migration by their expert mariner ancestors. Big smiling faces and joyful hearts reveal people who are keen to share their age-old traditions and authentic pacific cuisines as you sail between islands, speckled with steamy tropical rainforests, towering volcanoes, long ribbons of pink and white sandy beaches, swaying palm trees, turquoise lagoons teeming with marine life, colourful coral reefs and pristine atolls, and remaining tell-tale signs of WW2 occupation. For those heading to Panama, or those simply exploring the far reaches of the Pacific, the untouched Galapagos Archipelago – Darwin’s laboratory – is another whole world of discovery again. Isolated from the mainland for millions of years, the wildlife offers an amazing window into evolution with little or no crossbreeding with mainland species. And since the islands have remained largely uninhabited, the animals there have little instinctive fear of humans so you’ll experience close encounters with unique species such as flightless cormorants, colossal marine iguanas and doomed giant tortoises.